Amazon paraded out a cavalcade of new products and services at its AWS re:Invent conference in Las Vegas today, unveiling several new code-management and deployment tools, the Amazon Aurora MySQL database engine, and more.

(Related: Amazon throws cloud support behind PHP)

The trio of new AWS code tools is made up of AWS CodeDeploy, AWS CodeCommit and AWS CodePipeline. Here’s a breakdown of what each of the new code-management and deployment tools can do:
AWS CodeDeploy: Deploys released code to what Amazon describes as a “fleet” of EC2 instances, ranging in size from one to as many as tens of thousands of instances. Designed to deploy code at scale, the tool automatically schedules updates across multiple time zones without downtime, and can be managed from the AWS Management Console, command-line interface or through AWS APIs.
AWS CodeCommit: A managed revision-control service that hosts Git repositories and works with all Git-based tools. A developer or administrator can create a CodeCommit repository and assign permissions through the CodeCommit Console, and the tool will store the code, binaries, and metadata with redundancy in the AWS cloud, enabling developers to edit, compare, sync and revise code remotely.
AWS CodePipeline: A modeling and automation service for the software release process. CodePipeline helps to design development workflows and facilitate code through the staging, testing, and release process. The self-contained, end-to-end solution works with third-party tools and through the CodePipeline Console. Customers can use serial and parallel actions to construct graphical models and monitor source code.

AWS CodeDeploy is available today for AWS customers, while AWS CodeCommit and AWS CodePipeline are set for launch in the near future. More details about all three code tools is available in this blog post from AWS chief evangelist Jeff Barr.

Amazon Aurora: A MySQL-compatible database engine
Amazon also announced a new database engine at AWS re:Invent called Amazon Aurora.

Aurora is a MySQL-compatible database for the Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS). Amazon RDS is a service for operating and scaling a cloud-based MySQL database, and Aurora is designed to combine the speed and availability of commercial databases with the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of open-source databases, according to a blog post from Barr.

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A preview of Amazon Aurora

According to Amazon, the Aurora MySQL database engine adds storage in 10GB increments or on an as-needed basis with a maximum storage capacity of 64TB. It scales linearly as more data is added, with high burst rate options. Aurora data is backed up to Amazon S3, and according to Barr the RDS console has also been upgraded with additional instance information and monitoring options.

About Rob Marvin

Rob Marvin has covered the software development and technology industry as Online & Social Media Editor at SD Times since July 2013. He is a 2013 graduate of the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University with dual degrees in Magazine Journalism and Psychology. Rob enjoys writing about everything from features, entertainment, news and culture to his current work covering the software development industry. Reach him on Twitter at @rjmarvin1.