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Analyst Watch: How to adapt your skills and staffing for agile and lean



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March 16, 2012 —  (Page 1 of 2)
The automotive assembly line is a common metaphor for the software development life cycle: Both processes begin with a proper framework, and require skilled workers to build and unit-test subsystems that attach to the framework in a specific sequence as it moves down the line. In the name of efficiency, parts and subassemblies are made in huge batches, and are queued in storage depots until needed by subsequent processes. Eventually this collection of subsystems becomes a complete, shiny, new application/automobile that is system-tested and ultimately deployed to its customer base.

The automotive industry is also an apt metaphor for the challenges facing application development & delivery (AD&D) professionals today: the world has changed, and our business leaders need us to adapt to that change faster than we have. Cost efficiency, while still important, is yesterday's driver; falling well behind your competitors while maintaining optimized cost levels is this decade's recipe for the failure that nearly decimated the U.S. automotive industry.

To remain competitive, automotive manufacturers learned to bring lean and agile thinking to the assembly line, removing process rigor and replacing it with value-based metrics, flexible process models, and empowered, skilled workers. IT professionals must also reorganize to bring this product-owner/product-management mindset to bear building social, mobile applications that truly engage customers. To turn your AD&D organization into a lean, agile machine that can succeed in the new world, there are several things you must do.

Provide utility-level services, trusted services and partner-level services. The other big flaw in the assembly-line comparison is that it reduces the entire industry down to the creation of applications, virtually ignoring the other services the industry provides. Post-manufacture, automobiles, like applications, exist in an often-tumultuous ecosystem that includes:
1) Automotive dealers that employ a skilled workforce to provide utility-like maintenance and repair services
2) Restoration shops that can be trusted to refurbish classic (legacy) vehicles back to like-new condition
3) Customization shops that partner with customers to build exotic vehicles that are completely personalized to individual tastes
4) A fleet management service that allow demand to properly flow and decide when sedans, trucks, motorcycles and other vehicle types have outlived their useful life: a cradle-to-grave or assembly-line-to-junkyard view

Whether they know it or not, our business leaders need all of these services at various points in the life of a business. Over-focusing on creating new vehicles virtually ensures that we’ll fail to offer sufficient levels of competence for the above four services.


Related Search Term(s): agile, lean

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