Three pillars of observability

Cindy Sridharan’s popular “Distributed Systems Observability” book published by O’Reilly claims that logs, metrics, and traces are the three pillars of observability.  According to Sridharan, an event log is a record of events that contains both a timestamp and payload of content. Event logs come in three forms: Plaintext: A log record stored in plaintext … continue reading

Application performance management vs. application stability management

Traditional application performance management was built from the ground up to be for infrastructure operations and the emergent DevOps teams. They were not designed for product and engineering teams. But if you’re a developer, and you’re writing code to deliver to your customers in the form of an application or a service, you’d likely want … continue reading

Observability: It’s all about the data

Observability is the latest evolution of application performance monitoring, enabling organizations to get a view into CI/CD pipelines, microservices, Kubernetes, edge devices and cloud and network performance, among other systems. While being able to have this view is important, handling all the data these systems throw off can be a huge challenge for organizations. In … continue reading

Monitoring applications in modern software architectures

In today’s modern software world, applications and infrastructure are melding together in different ways. Nowhere is that more apparent than with microservices, delivered in containers that also hold infrastructure configuration code. That, combined with more complex application architectures (APIs, multiple data sources, multicloud distributions and more), and the ephemeral nature of software as temporary and … continue reading

Monitoring tools need to evolve

People have come to expect a certain level of performance from their applications, whether using a consumer application, such as a retail website, or using a business application to get their jobs done. But most monitoring solutions have not adapted to this collapsing of the consumer and business worlds into one, making it difficult for … continue reading

Digital experience monitoring: An outside-in view

Gartner research describes three things that are required  for a solution to be categorized as application performance monitoring: application discovery, diagnostics and tracing; data analysis; and digital experience monitoring. Digital experience monitoring, or DEM as it is sometimes called, is different from the other types of monitoring because it takes an outside-in view of the … continue reading

APM, AIOps and Observability

Monitoring your applications comes in many forms. There’s traditional application performance management, which begat AIOps, which begat observability. But are there really any differences? If so, where are they? Some believe these are marketing terms used to differentiate tools. Others point to it as more of an evolution of monitoring. All that said, the performance … continue reading

Gartner’s 3 requirements for APM

APM, as Gartner defines it in its Magic Quadrant criteria, is based on three broad sets of capabilities, and in order to be considered by Gartner an APM vendor, you have to have all three. Charley Rich, Gartner research director and lead author of its APM Magic Quadrant, explained: The first one is digital experience … continue reading

Application Performance Monitoring: What it means in today’s complex software world

Software continues to grow as the driver of today’s global economy, and how a company’s applications perform is critical to retaining customer loyalty and business. People now demand instant gratification and will not tolerate latency — not even a little bit. As a result, application performance monitoring is perhaps more important than ever to companies … continue reading

Focused on application vulnerabilities? You’re missing the bigger picture

In today’s era of digital transformation, every organization must focus on application security. However, focusing on security vulnerabilities alone is unwise because it’s nearly impossible to prioritize what needs to be done. “DevOps teams are sitting in front of a table with the keys to the kingdom on their computers,” said Jake King, co-founder and … continue reading

4 DevSecOps mistakes to avoid

DevSecOps isn’t just a practice, it’s a continuous learning experience. If you want to be successful faster, avoid these common misconceptions. #1: Business as usual is good enough Cybercriminals are constantly changing their tactics. If your organization’s application security practices are static, they aren’t as robust as they should be. RELATED CONTENT:  How to get … continue reading

How to get DevSecOps right

DevOps and security teams are learning how to work together, albeit somewhat awkwardly in these early days of DevSecOps. One reason why it can be difficult to get the partnership “right” is that people define DevSecOps in different ways. “If you asked a room of 10 people to define DevSecOps, you’d get 15 definitions. I … continue reading

Dynatrace replaces DevOps with NoOps

In 2012, software intelligence company Dynatrace set out to achieve seamless automation from development to production. Its other goal was to move code from development to production in an hour versus 24 hours. However, at the time, development and operations teams weren’t collaborating well. DevOps seemed like the right answer. Although operations had its own … continue reading

5 DevOps myths

Many organizations claim to be doing DevOps, but is that actually the case? For one thing, just about everybody has their own definition of DevOps, and that interpretation tends to impact how DevOps operates within a team or company. Following are five of the misconceptions. #1: DevOps = Dev + Ops On some level, parsing … continue reading

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